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Cosmos36

First oil change.

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Today, I changed out the factory fill synthetic blend and OEM filter for 6 quarts (measured precisely) of 5W-30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability synthetic oil. The oil was carefully researched & selected for my 2.7 TGDI engine for its additive package HTO-06 specs and formulation of Group 3 base stock oils including Shell's gas-to-liquid PurePlus technology. The oil filter was pre-soaked before installation, absorbing ~ 1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) of oil. The measured 6 quarts of oil added to the sump included the oil in the pre-soaked filter plus the soaking medium.. After installing the filter, adding the sump oil, running the engine for several minutes, and checking the oil level after a 15 minute period with the engine shut off, the oil level rested exactly on the dipstick full mark.

 

The oil change was very easy with NO under-engine splash cover to remove, the very visible, yellow easy-off (by hand, no tool required) plastic drain plug near the driver's side wheel assembly, and the readily accessible canister oil filter at the passenger side rear corner top of the engine. A 1/2 inch drive, 1 1/16 inch socket removes the canister. The filter stem requires replacement of 1 small nitrile O-ring, while the canister body requires 2 large O-rings. My prior experiences with similar canisters/O-rings indicates that the O-rings do not need to be replaced at every OC, but they're included with the OEM filter, so I prefer to do so.

 

It will be necessary to raise the MKX a few inches to facilitate access to the drain plug. I used 8 inch ramps. The oil was changed at 4879 miles.

 

There is a tutorial with pics at www.fordedgeforum.com/topic/18964-edu-changing-oil-in-27l-sport

 

BTW, despite some reports of "gushing oil" draining from the sump with accompanying splashed oil on the pavement etc., not a single drop was lost on my OC drain. If you examine the drain pan illustrated in the tutorial, you see why. Don't use those type of drain pans.

Edited by Cosmos36

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Thank you for the information!  I intend to do my own oil change as well on my X.

 

Glad to hear that the underbody shield does not need to be removed - I was wondering about that.  I had located the filter housing while checking fluids recently.

 

At 6,000 km / 3,728 miles I am still at 30% oil life according to the monitor, but I intend to get the change done as soon as I sweep/wash the winter salt and sand from the garage floor.

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Adam, since we share engines perhaps you'll be pleased to know that a thorough inspection of the used oil and filter with a 10X jeweler's piece indicated that no metallic material was present. IMO, reports of copious amounts of "break-in shavings and flakes" in the first oil change are hyperbole, at least in modern engines.

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Glad you found no flakes! I probably won't be checking that closely as I don't tend to keep vehicles very long, but it's good to know either way. I still believe in good maintenance, however and will follow your lead on the oil recommendation.

 

What percentage oil life remaining were you at 4,900 miles?

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Glad you found no flakes! ...

 

Not sure if its available but for my 1983 911 I got magnetic oil plugs (yes 2, when you have 14 liters of oil to change) that traps all the shavings.

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Adam...I didn't check the X's OLM since I have my own regimen for oil change intervals; same with my other 2 vehicles. I do, however, keep an eye of UOAs posted by others as engine mileage scenarios and oils change, but I err to the conservative side if for no other reason than because I enjoy DIY maintenance inputs and the placebo they provide. I'll likely adhere to a seasonal twice a year OC over 10,000 miles. Arbitrary, but conservative.

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Not sure if its available but for my 1983 911 I got magnetic oil plugs (yes 2, when you have 14 liters of oil to change) that traps all the shavings.

Well, since the oil plugs are now plastic, I doubt there's any mangetism to assist.

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I hadn't given any previous thought to magnetic oil pickups for the 2.7, but I suppose some vendor could easily integrate a magnet into the tip of the plastic drain plug. Also, a magnet ring would be a simple attachment to the 2.7's  plastic canister filter housing. I've always had faith that the oil filter will suffice to pick up any metal particles large enough to do any harm. At any rate, a magnet won't collect nonferrous metals, e.g. copper & aluminum which are commonly present in engine oil during break-in and those about to self-destruct.

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Well, since the oil plugs are now plastic, I doubt there's any mangetism to assist.

 

 

Here we go, new technology are not really helping us,,,

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.... I've always had faith that the oil filter will suffice to pick up any metal particles large enough to do any harm....

 

 

Most definitely, you want to cut open your oil filter, spread it out and see what it trap.

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IMO, the plastic 'no-wrench-required' drain plug on the 2.7 engine greatly facilitates changing that engine's oil. Now that I've done a 2.7 OC, I could repeat the process of removing/replacing the drain plug blindfolded and with no tools. Next time, it may even be possible to access the drain plug without raising the vehicle...I'll check it out.

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IMO, the plastic 'no-wrench-required' drain plug on the 2.7 engine greatly facilitates changing that engine's oil. Now that I've done a 2.7 OC, I could repeat the process of removing/replacing the drain plug blindfolded and with no tools. Next time, it may even be possible to access the drain plug without raising the vehicle...I'll check it out.

The brass ones have been available for years. I even have installed them on my snowblower, garden tractor, portable generator and garden tiller.

 

Somuch easier to do an oil change. On most I use an adapter with clear poly hose to direct the drain directly into an empty oil bottle.

 

EZ DRAIN

http://www.oildrainvalve.net/Ez-oil-drain-valve/

 

There are other brands available as well, I just use this brand and have had excellent results. Plus I like the idea that they are brass and (of course) chrome. Chrome always looks good over years and years of use. Always warm and friendly. Lol.

Edited by enigma-2

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enigma...to my knowledge there is no aftermarket replacement for the OEM plastic drain plug installed in the 2.7 engine's plastic oil pan. Please note a photo of the drain plug in the link posted in thread #1 above if you're not familiar with the 2.7's drain plug configuration.

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Today, I changed out the factory fill synthetic blend and OEM filter for 6 quarts (measured precisely) of 5W-30 Quaker State Ultimate Durability synthetic oil. The oil was carefully researched & selected for my 2.7 TGDI engine for its additive package HTO-06 specs and formulation of Group 3 base stock oils including Shell's gas-to-liquid PurePlus technology. The oil filter was pre-soaked before installation, absorbing ~ 1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) of oil. The measured 6 quarts of oil added to the sump included the oil in the pre-soaked filter plus the soaking medium.. After installing the filter, adding the sump oil, running the engine for several minutes, and checking the oil level after a 15 minute period with the engine shut off, the oil level rested exactly on the dipstick full mark.

 

The oil change was very easy with NO under-engine splash cover to remove, the very visible, yellow easy-off (by hand, no tool required) plastic drain plug near the driver's side wheel assembly, and the readily accessible canister oil filter at the passenger side rear corner top of the engine. A 1/2 inch drive, 1 1/16 inch socket removes the canister. The filter stem requires replacement of 1 small nitrile O-ring, while the canister body requires 2 large O-rings. My prior experiences with similar canisters/O-rings indicates that the O-rings do not need to be replaced at every OC, but they're included with the OEM filter, so I prefer to do so.

 

It will be necessary to raise the MKX a few inches to facilitate access to the drain plug. I used 8 inch ramps. The oil was changed at 4879 miles.

 

There is a tutorial with pics at www.fordedgeforum.com/topic/18964-edu-changing-oil-in-27l-sport

 

BTW, despite some reports of "gushing oil" draining from the sump with accompanying splashed oil on the pavement etc., not a single drop was lost on my OC drain. If you examine the drain pan illustrated in the tutorial, you see why. Don't use those type of drain pans.

 

Excellent detailed tutorial!

 

Here we go, new technology are not really helping us,,,

 

Today's engines used far superior technology as far as metals go that wear and tear isn't as much of a big issue as it was even 10 years ago.

 

Same for the lubricants.

Edited by Robert

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enigma...to my knowledge there is no aftermarket replacement for the OEM plastic drain plug installed in the 2.7 engine's plastic oil pan. Please note a photo of the drain plug in the link posted in thread #1 above if you're not familiar with the 2.7's drain plug configuration.

Ahhhh, yea. I didn't mean to replace the quick oil change value on the new 2.7's. I was referring to replacing the existing oil plugs with oil valves on existing installations.

 

(Note my reference to its use on several different types of yard equipment I own).

 

The only thing that would concern me with the Ford design, is that it's made out of plastic.

 

The underside of an automobile is a dangerous place. Rocks, constant dirt and sand, blasting the surfaces, chunks of ice scraping the bottom of the car's engine. Hence my proclivity for brass or steel for these parts. Time will tell if they did their homework.

Edited by enigma-2

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^ true enough, even the oil pan itself is plastic, isn't it? So the plastic plug was probably more of a necessity that a 'feature'.

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Ford is no stranger to composite (commonly aka plastic) oil pans and drain plugs. Circa MY 2011/2012, Power Stroke 6.7 diesel engines were transitioned back to metal oil pans with conventional drain plugs. Then the great debate began on Ford forums...rusting steel pans vis-a-vis leaking composite pans/plugs. It will interesting to see if there are any issues reported with the 2.7's composite oil pan/plug. From pics, I've noted that the MKX drain plug looks identical to the earlier diesel plug, however I suspect that any stresses on the 2.7 pan are miniscule compared to those of a V8 diesel pan and the 2.7's composite materials are hopefully an expression of reformulated/engineered results from Ford's earlier experiences with the diesel issues. 

 

It would appear that some quick lube vendors are capitalizing on 2.7 owner's possible vulnerabilities by attempting to upsell drain plugs at a reported ~ $9 each because "they leak if not regularly changed."

Edited by Cosmos36

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^ true enough, even the oil pan itself is plastic, isn't it? So the plastic plug was probably more of a necessity that a 'feature'.

True enough, but agaim, I'm talking about modifying, other, existing engines, which do not have a drain "valve". Such as my MKX's OEM steel pan with a steel plug.

 

Now I don't do oil changes on my MKX, (I do on all of my other machines), but if I did, I would install one of these drain "valves" in place of a plug. Soooooo much cleaner and easier. Connect a short piece of clear, plastic tubing, put it in an empty oil bottle (or any empty container), open the valve and drain. When done, close the valve, disconnect the tube and off you go. (Ok, fill with oil and then off you go). You get the point.

 

I'm not a fan of plastic to critical car needs. Plastic gets brittle in cold, steels' proven in freeling temps. If it breaks or leaks, you could get stranded in the middle of nowhere. At night. On a weekend. In a blizzard like we had on Saturday.

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For those wondering why it's necessary to wait 15 minutes (or more) to drain and/or check oil on a 2.7 engine after shutting the engine off, e.g.doing an oil change,

 

see post #10 at  www.f150forum.com/f118/2016-2-7-eb-oil-change-using-vacum-extractor-through-dipstick-tube-341169

Edited by Cosmos36

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Time to let all the oil drain back to the pan I would presume. Probably a good idea on any engine but not mandatory.

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Wondering why it's necessary to wait 15 minutes (or more) to drain and/or check oil on a 2.7 engine after shutting the engine off, e.g. oil change.

 

See post #10 at www.f150forum.com/f118/2016-2-7-eb-oil-change-using-vacum-extractor-through-dipstick-tube-341169

If you read the text on the image, it states that the dipstick is located in its own, separate reservoir. The oil flows into this reservoir through a small check valve, and can take up to 15 minutes to fully leach over into the dip stick side chamber.

 

Question is, why is there a side chamber needed at all? And why a check valve into the "side chamber"?

Edited by enigma-2

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To keep more oil in the top of the engine for auto Start/stop driving.

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One of the problems of email/internet communications is that tonal inflections cannot be conveyed. I have edited my post #19 to hopefully eliminate an inflection issue with the original post.

 

Kirby & enigma nailed the answer. If more folks were aware of the check valve function, there might be less sump overfills reported by owners of 2.7 engines and techs contributing (intentionally or not...are you listening 'Iffy Lube' vendors?) to an issue. Ford issued a TSB to dealers to address the matter.

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One of the problems of email/internet communications is that tonal inflections cannot be conveyed. I have edited my post #19 to hopefully eliminate an inflection issue with the original post.

 

Now it makes a lot more sense. I suspected that was what you meant after I posted but wasn't sure.

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To keep more oil in the top of the engine for auto Start/stop driving.

So the check valve prevents the oil at the top if the engine from draining back to the pan?

Wonder what happens when the valve sticks open or closed?

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