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Graftman

2.7 engine bay mystery box

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Hoping someone can tell me what the silver box is in the top right of the engine bay that I drew the giant red arrow (fat fingers and small arrows are a problem)

Ive seen a few bays before in this model year (2016) and I have not noticed it in any others.

Thanks!

Screenshot_20210421-223508_Kijiji~3.jpg

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Might want to ask the wife...  Just saying 😁

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23 hours ago, NOTMY911 said:

Might want to ask the wife...  Just saying 😁

Haha! I actually have it figured. Its an electronic anti-corrosion device installed at the dealership from new. Not something I would personally pay for. Science seems to be a little lacking there for land vehicles. Unless your vehicle is submerged in water I'm thinking it doesn't do much (like for ships)   ;)

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It's known as an electromagnetic corrosion protection module. It sends radio-frequency, pulse-wave surface currents over the steel body of the car.

 

From what I've read, it works by breaking the zinc oxide formation allowing the zinc to protect the break. As I understand it, a scratch or stone chip exposes the steel, and the galvanizing sacrifices itself to protect the steel and slow the corrosion process. However moisture in the atmosphere causes the zinc to form zinc oxide. Zinc oxide slow or prevents the zinc from closing the wound. The module generate radio waves which reacts to the zinc oxide and helps break it done. It's been proven to work, but the degree of effectiveness is related to many variables. Its most effective on fixed structures like steel tanks.

 

Your hear alot of naysayers, but its patented and has a lot of engineering behind it. Pretty rare to find a car that has one. Can be removed and put on your next car. (Some models have a push button to test of working or not).

 

I looked up the patents. 

7,198,706

6,875,336

6,331,243

6,046,515

 

These are dealer add-ons and very profitable for them. 

 

Edited by enigma-2

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16 hours ago, enigma-2 said:

... patents. 

7,198,706

6,875,336

6,331,243

6,046,515

 

These are dealer add-ons and very profitable for them. 

 

 

A patent on a product provides absolutely NO warranty, guarantee, or assurance that the product has any functional worth or utility whatsoever. I can well recall the patented 'superchargers' of yesteryear (small spinning fan blades installed in the throats of carburetors) accompanied by the claims of vast horsepower increases, all at a minimal price to attract the gullible.

 

"...very profitable" as a dealer add-on is the paramount worth of the subject item.

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They were independently tested.

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So I've subsequently done a bit of reading on these things. Heres what I gather.

1. Lots of evidence for use on stationary, continuous objects (steel containers etc)

2. Evidence for use on marine applications.

 

The companies marketing these devices aimed at passenger land vehicles, use the device as means to actually sell extended warranty against rust (something which is already highly mitigated)

Whether the device works or not is somewhat irrelevant to the purpose its being used for.

Passenger vehicles just have too much other material in the way (fibreglass, plastic, rubber, paint, sealants, gaskets, weatherstripping etc) to get any sort of congruent circuit.

But again, its the recipe for the sale that matters; think of the metal box as a symbol of the warranty. 

Remember who is hedging their bets, and the house always wins.  ;)

 

 

 

 

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*effective circuit

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Graftman

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Back in the day when I flew with a Navy maritime patrol squadron in the western Pacific locale (e.g. Marshall Islands, etc.) our aircraft were rapidly succumbing to corrosion, especially around bomb bay door rivets. We engaged in a project using various means to inhibit the devastation, including liquid sprays, paints, primers, and electronic devices (such as the subject 'engine bay mystery box') and other technologies. In summary, the absolute most worthless, least effective means were the electronic approaches to the issue.

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12 hours ago, Cosmos36 said:

Back in the day when I flew with a Navy maritime patrol squadron in the western Pacific locale (e.g. Marshall Islands, etc.) our aircraft were rapidly succumbing to corrosion, especially around bomb bay door rivets. We engaged in a project using various means to inhibit the devastation, including liquid sprays, paints, primers, and electronic devices (such as the subject 'engine bay mystery box') and other technologies. In summary, the absolute most worthless, least effective means were the electronic approaches to the issue.

While anecdotal, I'd have to concur with this observation.

It seems that these companies are using science from outside of its intended scope to sell warranty. 

They could sell the same warranty without the "mystery box" but humans like to put trust in things they can see and touch. Plus it has a light that flashes, so this clearly means its working and doing its job.  ;)

In terms of profit (which is the purpose) the device is irrelevant.

 

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21 hours ago, Graftman said:

They could sell the same warranty without the "mystery box"

 

 

I've tried to explain this many times over the years.   A warranty is just an insurance policy.   It has nothing directly to do with the quality or effectiveness of the product.  The only difference is a warranty on a product with poor quality is more expensive than a warranty on a good product (for the provider).

 

In my college days I sold furniture and we had a silicon based fabric treatment similar to scotchguard but far better - lasted for years.   The chemicals themselves weren't very expensive but we sold it for maybe $300 for a sofa because it came with a 5 year warranty against stains.

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